• Use a knife dipped in vinegar to slice mold off cheese. Dip after each slice to kill mold and prevent its reoccurrence.


  • To bring out the true full flavor of hard and semi-hard cheeses warm to room temperature for serving.


  • Store carton of cottage cheese upside down. It will keep twice as long.


  • If you have leftover egg yolks, poach them until they harden, then put them through a sieve. Use as a garnish for salads, stew, and more.


  • Cover leftover yolks with 2 tbsp. oil in small jar; refrigerate; use in 3 days.


  • To determine age of an egg, place in bottom of bowl of cold water, if it lays on its side - strictly fresh. If it stands at an angle - at least 3 days old. if it stands on end, it is at least 10 days old.


  • To keep egg yolks from crumbling when slicing hard-boiled eggs, wet knife between each cut.


  • Add bread crumbs to scrambled eggs to improve flavor and stretch servings.


  • When boiling eggs, it helps prevent cracking if you wet the shells in cold water before placing egg in hot water.


  • A little vinegar in water when egg does crack will seal crack.


  • Salt in the water will help eggs cooked in the shell to not crack.


  • To release all the white from the shells, set eggs in pan of warm water before using.


  • Egg whites for meringue should be at room temperature for greater volume when beaten.

  • Meringue will not shrink if spread to touch crust and baked in moderate oven.

  • Fluffier omelets are not a secret. Just add a dash of cold water, a couple of dashes of skim milk, and a smidgeon of cornstarch. Your omelets will be light, airy and fluffy.


  • Poached eggs are a cinch. To keep the whites from spreading when you're poaching, just add a few drops of white vinegar to the water.


  • In some parts of the country brown eggs are considered to be of a higher quality than white eggs. The reverse is believed to be true in other parts of the country. Actually, there is no difference in the quality, so buy whichever is cheaper.


  • If you're not sure whether an egg is raw or cooked, lay it on its side and give it a whirl. If the egg wobbles while rotating, it's raw.


  • Storing eggs with large end up helps to keep the yolk centered.


  • A covered container is best for storing whole shelled eggs because the membrane is porous and will absorb odors of foods stored near them. Egg whites should be kept in a tightly-covered jar. Yolks keep best covered with water.


  • The average recipe calls for eggs that are medium to large. If the eggs you are using are small, figure 3 tbsp. of slightly mixed whole eggs equal 1 average-sized egg.


  • It's a good idea not to drop eggs directly from the shell into the batter. One bad egg will spoil the batter. Crack each egg open in a separate bowl. If the egg is rotten you will smell it. Also, if a bit of eggshell falls into it, you will be able to remove it with ease.


  • Keep dried eggs in unopen packages in a cool place that is about 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit, but preferably in the refrigerator. Once opened, keep in a tightly-covered can or jar in the refrigerator.


  • There is a way of separating egg-whites and yolks without breaking the yolks. Puncture a small hole in one end of the shell and let the white drain into a dish while the yolk stays unbroken inside. Afterwards, break open the shell and remove the yolk.


  • Eggs darken aluminum, so it's a good idea not to beat egg-whites in an aluminum bowl. Use bowls made of stainless-steel, glass, porcelain or enamel.


  • If the egg you are about to boil is cracked on one side, crack it a little on the other side. If you do this, you will find that the egg will stay inside the shell while it boils.


  • Try to avoid freezing foods that contain hard=boiled egg-whites. Frozen egg-whites change in texture. They become tough and take on a peculiar flavor.


  • If while boiling eggs, they become cracked, add 1 tsp. of salt to the water, the salt will close the crack.


  • It's better to simmer eggs, than boil them, because egg-whites and yolks tend to coagulate at temperatures below the boiling point of water. Simmer soft-cook eggs 3 minutes, 4 minutes for firm by soft yolks; 5 minutes for eggs even more firm, but still soft, Hard-cooked eggs should be left on the stove for 10 minutes. If you simmer your hard-cooked eggs, you'll avoid that green division that appears between yolk and white, and you'll avoid that hard-boiled egg odor. Also, cooking at a high temperature toughens the protein in eggs, and the tougher eggs are, the less appetizing they taste. Eggs cooked at lower temperatures taste better.


  • It happens to all of us: You crack open an egg and a tiny piece of its shell falls into the bowl along with the raw egg. If you’ve tried to get it out with your finger or a spoon, you know the slippery dilemma you face. Next time, wet your finger with water before attempting to fish it out. You’ll be shocked at how easily it can be grabbed and eliminated.


  • Always have eggs in your fridge. You just never know when someone will split their head open, or cut their finger while cooking, and so on. See that membrane there? While the blood is gushing - hold pressure and crack open an egg. Peel the membrane off and put it on the wound (continue holding pressure). The membrane will harden and keep the wound closed until you can get to the ER for stitches. If you even need them that is. Nature: 1, Band aids: 0